Theresa May holds press conference with Turkish president – as it happened

The government will set out a “detailed, ambitious and precise” explanation of the UK’s position on the future relationship with the EU ahead of the critical summit at the end of June.

It’s expected to include the plan for a customs relationship that avoids re-establishing a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic.

David Davis, the Brexit secretary, told cabinet this morning that it would be the “most significant” publication on the EU since the referendum.

Although EU negotiators will not see the proposals in advance, it will be based on previous negotiations.

Nigel Farage, the former Ukip leader, has said he would be happy to visit the Irish border and listen to people’s views about Brexit.

In contrast to Brexiter Jacob Rees-Mogg, who recently said he would have little to gain by a visit to the region, Farage has just returned from a weekend in Northern Ireland with the DUP.

Ian Paisley MP
(@ianpaisleymp)

Great weekend in Ballymena with @Nigel_Farage @Arron_banks @andywigmore pic.twitter.com/MRTfz1fywV

May 13, 2018

The Guardian caught up with him after spotting him lunching in the Rotunda bar in the building which also houses the newspaper.

“The Good Friday agreement has nothing to do with it,” he said. “Leo Varadkar is not acting in the interests of Ireland but in the interests of the EU,” he said arguing that Theresa May had already “compromised” too much in December with the “backstop” arrangement for the border guaranteeing regulatory alignment on the island of Ireland. That allowed “the EU to hold us to ransom”, he said.

Farage argued that a hard border would now be inevitable in Ireland but that a compromise could be found.

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